The "O Antiphons" of Advent

The Roman Church has been singing the "O" Antiphons since at least the eighth century. They are the antiphons that accompany the Magnificat canticle of Evening Prayer from December 17-23. They are a magnificent theology that uses ancient biblical imagery drawn from the messianic hopes of the Old Testament to proclaim the coming Christ as the fulfillment not only of Old Testament hopes, but present ones as well. Their repeated use of the imperative "Come!" embodies the longing of all for the Divine Messiah.

 

December 23

O Emmanuel, our King and Giver of Law:
come to save us, Lord our God!

via USCCB

—From "Catholic Household Blessings & Prayers"

The "O Antiphons" of Advent

The Roman Church has been singing the "O" Antiphons since at least the eighth century. They are the antiphons that accompany the Magnificat canticle of Evening Prayer from December 17-23. They are a magnificent theology that uses ancient biblical imagery drawn from the messianic hopes of the Old Testament to proclaim the coming Christ as the fulfillment not only of Old Testament hopes, but present ones as well. Their repeated use of the imperative "Come!" embodies the longing of all for the Divine Messiah.

 

December 22

O King of all nations and keystone of the Church:
come and save man, whom you formed from the dust!

 

via USCCB

The "O Antiphons" of Advent

 

The Roman Church has been singing the "O" Antiphons since at least the eighth century. They are the antiphons that accompany the Magnificat canticle of Evening Prayer from December 17-23. They are a magnificent theology that uses ancient biblical imagery drawn from the messianic hopes of the Old Testament to proclaim the coming Christ as the fulfillment not only of Old Testament hopes, but present ones as well. Their repeated use of the imperative "Come!" embodies the longing of all for the Divine Messiah.

 

December 21

O Radiant Dawn,
splendor of eternal light, sun of justice:
come and shine on those who dwell in darkness and in the
shadow of death.

vis USCCB

The "O Antiphons" of Advent

The Roman Church has been singing the “O” Antiphons since at least the eighth century. They are the antiphons that accompany the Magnificat canticle of Evening Prayer from December 17-23. They are a magnificent theology that uses ancient biblical imagery drawn from the messianic hopes of the Old Testament to proclaim the coming Christ as the fulfillment not only of Old Testament hopes, but present ones as well. Their repeated use of the imperative “Come!” embodies the longing of all for the Divine Messiah.

December 19

O Root of Jesse’s stem,
sign of God’s love for all his people:
come to save us without delay!

via USCCB

“O” Antiphons

The Roman Church has been singing the "O" Antiphons since at least the eighth century. They are the antiphons that accompany the Magnificat canticle of Evening Prayer from December 17-23. They are a magnificent theology that uses ancient biblical imagery drawn from the messianic hopes of the Old Testament to proclaim the coming Christ as the fulfillment not only of Old Testament hopes, but present ones as well. Their repeated use of the imperative "Come!" embodies the longing of all for the Divine Messiah.

 

December 18

O Leader of the House of Israel,
giver of the Law to Moses on Sinai:
come to rescue us with your mighty power!

via USCCB

The Salvation of Israel through Cyrus via divineoffice.org

From the book of the prophet Isaiah

45:1-13

The salvation of Israel through Cyrus

Thus says the Lord to his anointed, Cyrus,whose right hand I grasp,

Subduing nations before him,

and making kings run in his service,

Opening doors before him

and leaving the gates unbarred:

I will go before you

and level the mountains;

Bronze doors I will shatter,

and iron bars I will snap.

I will give you treasures out of the darkness,

and riches that have been hidden away,

That you may know that I am the Lord, the God of Israel,

who calls you by your name.
For the sake of Jacob, my servant,

of Israel my chosen one,

I have called you by your name,

giving you a title, though you knew me not.

I am the Lord and there is no other,

there is no God besides me.

It is I who arm you, though you know me not,

so that toward the rising and the setting of the sun

men may know that there is none besides me.

I am the Lord, there is no other;

I form the light, and create the darkness,

I make well-being and create woe;

I, the Lord, do all these things.
Let justice descend, O heavens, like dew from above,

like gentle rain let the skies drop it down.

Let the earth open and salvation bud forth;

let justice also spring up!

I, the Lord, have created this.
Woe to him who contends with his Maker;

a potsherd among potsherds of the earth!

Dare the clay say to its modeler, “What are you doing?”

or, “What you are making has no hands”?

Woe to him who asks a father, “What are you begetting?”

or a woman, “What are you giving birth to?”
Thus says the Lord,

the Holy One of Israel, his maker:

You question me about my children,

or prescribe the work of my hands for me!

It was I who made the earth

and created mankind upon it;

It was my hands that stretched out the heavens;

I gave the order to all their host.

It was I who stirred up one for the triumph of justice;

all his ways I make level.

He shall rebuild my city

and let my exiles go free

Without price or ransom,

says the Lord of hosts.
via divineoffice.org