Churchill: “What Kind of a People Do They Think We Are?”

“If you will allow me to use other language, I will say that he must indeed have a blind soul who cannot see that some great purpose and design is being worked out here below of which we have the honor to be the faithful servants. It is not given to us to peer into the mysteries of the future. Still, I avow my hope and faith, sure and inviolate, that in the days to come the British and American peoples will, for their own safety and for the good of all, walk together in majesty, in justice and in peace.”

Those words of Winston Churchill, addressed to a joint session of Congress,Dec. 26, 1941, shortly after The United States entered the War, are still a powerful acknowledgement of the Providence of God, and a battle cry to unite against Evil in all its intrusions.

Churchill spoke clarity and truth with resolve, clarion in its urgency:

You do not, I am certain, underrate the severity of the ordeal to which you and we have still to be subjected. The forces ranged against us are enormous. They are bitter, they are ruthless. The wicked men and their factions, who have launched their peoples on the path of war and conquest, know that they will be called to terrible account if they cannot beat down by force of arms the peoples they have assailed. They will stop at nothing.

When our leaders fail to inspire, our hearts must lean heavy on the lessons and inspirations of the past. We are the same American people, again, being tested, yet still knowing how remarkable we are on the scene of history. As cultures go, we are yet in our youth, still seeking immortal values to carry this ship of State.

Churchill asks Congress on December 26, 1941:

What kind of a people do they think we are? Is it possible that they do not realize that we shall never cease to persevere against them until they have been taught a lesson which they and the world will never forget?

Churchill’s words proved oh, too, true!  We are still learning that we never cease procuring and securing our freedoms.

 

Winston Churchill’s Way With Words

We have a president who loves to make speeches, but there is a gap spanning the space between his oratory and his heart.  After almost seven years, and words ad nauseum, who can believe a word he utters?

Our present age, challenged by specters few understand cries out for a leader to rally this nation’s greatness and unify us under a banner, red, white and blue with a spangle of stars to eclipse the cultural diversity at whose altar so many worship. We used to be a melting pot, but now inflamed fractions of competing cultures, persuaded that their slice of the American pie  is somehow owed to them, no longer grateful, are envious, suspicious and, most of all, impatient.

Who can lead us out of this enveloping darkness. Where is the man with more than hollow words and empty heart? I long for a Churchill.  President John F. Kennedy, himself a man with a message for our nation and his time, said of Winston Churchill:

“In the dark days and darker nights when England stood alone — and most men save Englishmen despaired of England’s life — he mobilized the English language and sent it into battle.”

This podcast will throw a little light on the making of such a man.

Winston Churchill’s Way With Words via npr.org