Churchill: “What Kind of a People Do They Think We Are?”

“If you will allow me to use other language, I will say that he must indeed have a blind soul who cannot see that some great purpose and design is being worked out here below of which we have the honor to be the faithful servants. It is not given to us to peer into the mysteries of the future. Still, I avow my hope and faith, sure and inviolate, that in the days to come the British and American peoples will, for their own safety and for the good of all, walk together in majesty, in justice and in peace.”

Those words of Winston Churchill, addressed to a joint session of Congress,Dec. 26, 1941, shortly after The United States entered the War, are still a powerful acknowledgement of the Providence of God, and a battle cry to unite against Evil in all its intrusions.

Churchill spoke clarity and truth with resolve, clarion in its urgency:

You do not, I am certain, underrate the severity of the ordeal to which you and we have still to be subjected. The forces ranged against us are enormous. They are bitter, they are ruthless. The wicked men and their factions, who have launched their peoples on the path of war and conquest, know that they will be called to terrible account if they cannot beat down by force of arms the peoples they have assailed. They will stop at nothing.

When our leaders fail to inspire, our hearts must lean heavy on the lessons and inspirations of the past. We are the same American people, again, being tested, yet still knowing how remarkable we are on the scene of history. As cultures go, we are yet in our youth, still seeking immortal values to carry this ship of State.

Churchill asks Congress on December 26, 1941:

What kind of a people do they think we are? Is it possible that they do not realize that we shall never cease to persevere against them until they have been taught a lesson which they and the world will never forget?

Churchill’s words proved oh, too, true!  We are still learning that we never cease procuring and securing our freedoms.

 

Congressional Panel Hears Calls for Genocide Designation for Mideast Christians

Congressional Panel Hears Calls for Genocide Designation for Mideast Christians

EPIC – Trey Gowdy gets a standing ovation on House Floor – ‘ – The Absurd Report

EPIC – Trey Gowdy gets a standing ovation on House Floor – ‘ – The Absurd Report.

20 Ways Media Completely Misread Congress’ Weak-Sauce Benghazi Report

Throw the Rascals Out? – Thomas Sowell – Part 1

via Throw the Rascals Out? – Thomas Sowell –

Polls indicate that the public is so disgusted with Washington politicians of both parties that a surprisingly large proportion of the people would like to get rid of the whole lot of them.

It is certainly understandable that the voters would like to “throw the rascals out.” But there is no point in throwing the rascals out, if we are just going to get a new set of rascals to replace them.

In other words, we need to think about what there is about current political practices that repeatedly bring to power such a counterproductive set of people. Those we call “public servants” have in fact become public masters. And they act like it.

They squander ever more vast amounts of our tax money, and still leave trillions of dollars of national debt to be paid by our children and grandchildren. They intrude into our private lives with ever more restrictions, red tape and electronic surveillance. And they turn different groups of Americans against each other with class warfare rhetoric and policies.

None of this is inevitable. In fact, this pattern is largely the culmination of political trends set in motion during the 1930s, and reaching a climax today. During the 1920s, the national debt was reduced and the role of government scaled back. Unemployment went as low as 1.8 percent.

President Calvin Coolidge, with every prospect of being reelected in 1928, declared simply: “I do not choose to run.” Later, in his memoirs, he explained how dangerous it is to have anyone remain too long in the White House, surrounded by flattery and insulated from reality. What a contrast that attitude is with the attitude of the current occupant of the White House!

The contrast extends beyond these two presidents. What we have today that we did not have in the early history of this country is a permanent political class in Washington — a Congress and an ever growing federal bureaucracy composed of people who have become a permanent ruling class.

The United States was not founded by career politicians but by people who took time out from their regular professions to serve during a crucial time in the creation of a new nation, and a new kind of nation in a world ruled by kings and emperors.

Read more: Throw the Rascals Out? – Thomas Sowell – Page 1.

Throw the Rascals Out?: Part II – Thomas Sowell – Page full

The public’s opinion of politicians of both parties seems to have reached a new low. But no matter how much the voters detest Congress — or how justifiably — that does not mean that there will be radical changes at the next election.

For one thing, \”Congress\” is not on the ballot. Only individual members of Congress are. Most voters like their own Senator or Representative, often because of special favors that these incumbents have done for their own constituency — at the taxpayers\’ expense.

Add to this the so-called \”campaign reform\” laws that restrict the raising of money that challengers need, in order to counter the millions of dollars\’ worth of free advertising that incumbents get through ordinary media coverage, enhanced by the incumbents\’ sponsoring of ever more legislation, expanding the role of government.

The very longevity of incumbents in Congress makes it expedient for them to treat each other as \”facts of life\” — people with whom you have to \”go along to get along.\” One of their common interests as incumbents is reelection. This can lead to all sorts of bipartisan log-rolling legislation to hand out the taxpayers\’ money in ways that benefit incumbents of both parties.

In short, longevity in office can create more longevity in office. Moreover, this longevity can attract campaign contributions from special interests who expect something in return — if only a lightening up on government restrictions and red tape.

Many among the intelligentsia prefer to think of special interests as corrupting our dedicated public servants with campaign contributions. But Peter Schweizer\’s new book, \”Extortion,\” shows what happens as the extorting of tribute by politicians in a position to do a lot of harm to businesses that do not pay them protection money.

via Throw the Rascals Out?: Part II – Thomas Sowell – Page full.