Fr. Michael Scanlan OSF–Man on a Mission

Fr. Michael Scanlan’s continuing legacy

April 10, 2014

BY JOANNE KERSTEN

In the history of Franciscan University, many will agree that the Rev. Michael Scanlan, TOR, made a huge impact.

“He was so pastoral, so fatherly,” Chrissy Casazza of Madonna of the Streets said of their past household advisor. “He is so funny and sweet and humble still to this day.”

Scanlan is currently at the Sacred Heart Province motherhouse in Loretto, Penn.  The Rev. Terence Henry, TOR, said he has been told that Scanlan’s spirits are high and he is being taken good care of.

Concerning Scanlan’s overall health condition now, Casazza said that he looks healthy but has recently become sicker.  He remembers the big things, but not the smaller details, she continued.

“He is still fully himself and the faith is still fully in him,” Casazza said.

Henry said, “I pray for him in his declining health.”

In the spring of 2013, members of Madonna of the Streets household were treated to a surprise visit with their first advisor.

“His face lit up when we saw him,” remembers Amy Alexander, a member of Madonna of the Streets.  She said that they were able to sit and talk with him and listen to different stories about their household when he was their advisor.

“He was, through Christ, a father.  He mastered the gift of the priesthood,” said Casazza.  She also gave special attention to noting how he shaped Franciscan and was a “living pillar in the Franciscan community.”

Henry also remembered his pastoral side.

“My favorite memories of him are a pastor to the student body,” Henry said.  He also mentioned that although his health would not always allow Scanlan to travel, he could stay on campus and serve the students.

Along with being a father to the campus, Scanlan also showed strong determination through his work at the university. Henry said that Scanlan swam “against the academic tide,” noting how much of Catholic higher education was not following the Church.

The transformation that Scanlan was able to put into motion didn’t happen overnight. Henry said that Scanlan’s vision was a university that was with the Church, and united reason and faith.

“It was a simple vision, but it was very difficult,” Henry said.

“The fruit of his work we can see in the graduates,” Henry continued. “He realized what needed to be done could not be done only in the classroom. … He didn’t let his vision get watered down or compromised.”

When asked what Scanlan would say about Franciscan University today, Henry said, “He would say that the adventure is continuing.” Henry remembered how Scanlan placed Franciscan in the hands of the Lord and his providence, and how it is still being guided and still asking how it can serve the Church.

Alexander said, “Never forget what he has done for this university, and all the lives he touched through his ministry.”

Casazza agreed, “We would not have Franciscan without him.”

Due to deadline constraints, The Troubadour was not able to get in contact with Scanlan for an interview before going to print.

“Why I refuse to bless children at communion”

A priest writes: “Why I refuse to bless children at communion” — UPDATED.

Here’s Father Cory Sticha on the topic:

I’ve been thinking more and more about my concerns around giving special blessings to children at Mass. There are a number of people here who are continuing to express concern because of my stance on not blessing children in the communion line. To be clear, this is a position taken not out of spite, but out of a respect for the liturgy and for the documents of the Second Vatican Council. In paragraph 22, Sacrosanctum Concilium states, “Therefore no other person, even if he be a priest, may add, remove, or change anything in the liturgy on his own authority.” A priest does not have the authority to add a blessing to the liturgy for anyone, because a priest does not have the authority to add anything to the liturgy. It doesn’t matter if other priests go beyond their authority and do it in disobedience. In my mind, it is inappropriate, and I will not. Period."Read More:

Golgotha of Jasna Gora – Passion Art

H/T Julia : Golgotha of Jasna Gora – Artist: Jerzy Duda Gracz

More Golgotha of Jasna Gora

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Golgotha of Jasna Gora–Paintings

H/T Julia : Golgotha of Jasna Gora – Artist: Jerzy Duda Gracz

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Golgotha of Jasna Gora

H/T Julia : Golgotha of Jasna Gora – Artist: Jerzy Duda Gracz

 

 Here a bit more information about the images.

In the shrine at Czestochowa, upstairs from the famous icon of the Black Madonna, a 21st-century Way of the Cross reminds us that our real enemy is not the evil outside of us but the sin within us. In March 2001, the late Polish painter Jerzy Duda Gracz presented the monastery at Jasna Gora, one of the most popular pilgrimage sites in the world, with new Stations of the Cross. Gracz named these paintings after Golgotha, the mountain where Jesus was crucified, but many of the landscapes and faces he included in them are eerily recognizable to present-day viewers.

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“I Came to Carmel to Save Souls and to Pray for Priests.” (via Carmelite Sisters’s Blog)

I posted this some time ago, but the Holy Spirit gives it the breath of eternity and Pentecost.

These words from St. Therese really do encapsulate what is at the heart of every Carmelite. Our Holy Mother, St. Teresa of Jesus (from Avila) wanted her daughters to be at the spiritual service of those who are at the front lines: priests. I am reminded of this daily in many ways. It was, in fact, the most attractive aspect of Carmel for me when I was looking into religious life and now it is my greatest joy to pray and sacrifice for priests. A f … Read More

via Carmelite Sisters’s Blog