Sunday Snippets–A Catholic Carnival

It’s time once again for Sunday Snippets. We are Catholic bloggers sharing weekly our best posts with one another.  Join us to read and/or contribute. To participate, go to your blog and create a post titled Sunday Snippets–A Catholic Carnival. Make sure that the post links back to here, and leave a link to your  snippets post on our host, mRAnn’s, site, This, That and the Other Thing.

Who really died?

Your Presence – Audio Post #Presence

Boy Wanders Onto Stage To Hang Out With #Pope Francis

The #Saints Crowned in Glory

Ceaseless Prayer

Too Many Words

This one was fun because Cardinal Giusseppi, Personal Assistant to Pope Francis, favorited it on Twitter.

Cardinal Giuseppe Cardinal Giuseppe

Sistine Chapel Close up and Spectacular – Vatican Virtual Tour

#Sistine Chapel Close up and Spectacular – Vatican Virtual Tour

Sistine Chapel Center RightVirtual Tour of Sistine Chapel complements of the Vatican and apparently done by Villanova. – Click,and drag to navigate. Lower left has + & – for zooming in and out.
       Sistine Chapel

Pope Francis Offering Holy Mass in the Sistine Chapel

Havemus Papam!

Havemus Papam! The crowds are jubilant awaiting our new Holy Father’s appearance at the Vatican balcony. I’m waiting for his first blessing.

Will Benedict Still Be ‘Pope’? | Daily News | NCRegister.com

Will Benedict Still Be ‘Pope’? | Daily News | NCRegister.com.

In his letter, Pope Benedict announced that he would step down from “the ministry of Bishop of Rome, Successor of St. Peter, entrusted to me by the cardinals on April 19, 2005, in such a way, that as from Feb. 28, 2013, at 20:00 hours, the See of Rome, the See of St. Peter, will be vacant and a conclave to elect the new Supreme Pontiff …”

The Pope signed his letter of resignation “BENEDICTUS PP. XVI,” and Bishop Paprocki noted that it “simply means that he is the sixteenth pope by the name ‘Benedict.’ That is a historical fact that will never change.”

Term of Endearment

Bishop Paprocki then suggested that Catholics should view the word “pope” as “an honorific, even a term of endearment (‘papa’ in Italian). It is not the title of an ecclesiastical office.”

Thus, just as Catholics continue to call a priest “Father,” even though “he has resigned from the office of pastor,” so Italians probably “will continue to call Pope Benedict Papa Benedetto even after he leaves office as the Bishop of Rome,” predicted the bishop, who lived in Rome for three and a half years while studying canon law.

“I don’t think people will have a hard time wrapping their minds around having a pope who is no longer the Roman pontiff, bishop of Rome, etc. Certainly, in direct address, one would never address him as anything but ‘Your Holiness.’”

That said, Bishop Paprocki added that it “would be best to know what Pope Benedict himself wants to be called after February 28, and I hope he will tell us.”

While some experts have said that the Pope should be called “Cardinal Ratzinger” after he formally resigns, Bishop Paprocki did not think term seemed “correct.”

“If he had resigned before reaching the age of 80, after which a cardinal may no longer vote in a papal conclave, I do not think he would have, should have or could have donned a red cassock and entered the conclave in the Sistine Chapel to vote for his successor.

“Instead, at 8pm Rome time on Feb. 28, 2013, Pope Benedict XVI will have a new identity to which we will have to become accustomed: His Holiness, Joseph Ratzinger, Pope Benedict XVI, former Roman/supreme pontiff, bishop emeritus of Rome.”

Read more: National Catholic Register